I was going to write an artist statement. I am writing it now.
As I write, an idea might take place between my writing and your reading (or it might not), who knows. By the second paragraph you are meant to know what my work looks like. We are on the first paragraph. As I write, new ideas come to my head but I have nothing to say about my work. If you are reading this you might already know what my work looks like (or do you?) and there is no need for the second paragraph. But let us assume you do now know. Imagine a black square, a perfect rectangle. How would you describe it to someone who has never in his life seen a black square? Have I told you that in my language poison and medicine are the same words?

We begin the second paragraph. Now, close your eyes. By the time I count to five you will be able to picture the black square from the first paragraph. One, two, three, four, five. Imagine a museum, a vast, empty space with objects awkwardly placed on plinths and in the glass vitrines. They are simple everyday objects: a child’s shoe, tea cup, cardboard box, blue paint, a small black and white photograph of a piece of land, a block of concrete. Six, seven, eight, nine, ten. You can open your eyes now. The objects from the museum miraculously appear before you as you realise that we have been traveling in time for the last paragraph.








                                                                                                                                                        
Born in the USSR, brought up in the Republic of Georgia and now living in London, Sophio Medoidze is an artist and filmmaker who works with film, writing, photography and sculpture. For a time, she worked anonymously as part of Clara Emigrand collective. Her work is marked by precarity and explores the poetic potential of uncertainty. She often acts in her own films, which progress by juxtaposing different image modalities and bashing sounds against one another.
Her work is driven by the desire that is caught up between state violence and personal agency. Her work has been shown, amongst others at LUX London, CAC Bretigny, Serpentine Cinema (Peckhamplex), Kunstmuseum Luzern, Whitechapel Gallery, Arnolfini, Tbilisi Art Fair’s (TAF) public programme. She is a recipient of Feature Expanded Development award for her feature film ‘Let us flow!’ (with HOME, Manchester + Lo schermo dell’arte, Florence).


Q&A with Adam Pugh (exerpt) LUX, London


+ Portfolio Request

+ CV

+Vimeo